Exegeting CNN’s Don Lemon

I’m trying to be apolitical. I believe Christians living in America have historically been way too devoted to politics and nationalism, with many even going so far as to claim America was in a special, covenantal relationship with God similar to ancient Israel. I believe we Christians need to think of ourselves more as ambassadors for the Lord and His Kingdom rather than deeply-rooted temporal citizens.

I have a Christian friend who is VERY politically-minded. This individual is actually a fan of the Democratic Party. How can that be, you ask? The person is admittedly not happy that the Democratic Party fully supports abortion and the LGBT agenda, but believes that the DP, as a whole, represents a more caring and compassionate brand of political leadership than the Republican Party, especially in light of the last 3.5 years with President Donald Trump in office. This individual is not alone. Surveys show that around 25% of “evangelical Christians” support the Democratic Party.

Anyway, I recently came across a news item that I couldn’t wait to share with my friend. CNN hosts, Don Lemon (photo left) and Chris Cuomo, were recently having a discussion about Black Lives Matter and the current reevaluation of America’s founding fathers in light of the fact that many of them were slave owners.

Lemon argued that BLM is right to critically reexamine the founding fathers and tried to hammer home his point with the following ignorant remark:

“Jesus Christ, if that’s who you believe in, Jesus Christ, admittedly was not perfect when he was here on this earth. So why are we deifying the founders of this country, many of whom owned slaves?”

Well, EVERY Bible-believing, blood-bought, born-again Christian would surely recognize the folly of Lemon’s statement, or at least that is what I thought. Jesus Christ, the incarnate Son of God, DID live a life of sinless perfection here on this earth. He lived a perfect life and offered Himself as the atoning sacrifice for the sins of the world. But Jesus conquered sin and death when He rose from the grave and offers forgiveness and eternal life to all who repent of their sin and accept Him as Savior by faith alone.

It was clear from Lemon’s statement that he is not a student of the Bible or a disciple of Jesus Christ. I presented the 2:45-minute video snippet of Lemon’s remarks (see below) to my Democratic Party-loving friend along with a few of my critical comments. In response, the individual claimed that I had misinterpreted Lemon’s remarks. According to my friend, what Don Lemon meant by “Jesus Christ admittedly was not perfect” was either (A) that Jesus was clothed in imperfect human flesh or (B) that Jesus was tempted in all ways, yet without sin. Hmm. Those interpretations were awkward and naive attempts to push a square block through a round hole. In the context of his remarks, Lemon was clearly attempting to present Jesus Christ as having been morally imperfect. My friend and I debated Lemon’s intended meaning for awhile, but the conversation quickly turned personal as usually happens when my friend and I discuss politics, so I dropped it.

Lemon’s remark about Jesus Christ begins at the 1:34 mark in the video below:

 

 

The bottom line for me: both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party are part of the world system and will come to an end some day.

31 thoughts on “Exegeting CNN’s Don Lemon

  1. Detachment from our country and culture is a challenge for many Christians. Faith and nation are so rooted together, esp for those who neglect the scriptures. In response to current upheavals and threat of socialism many believers actually feel betrayed. I understand loyalty and patriotism but it is also a snare that dulls our view and allegiance to God’s coming Kingdom.
    Perhaps many Christian will be praying against the antichrist to preserve their lives here. But our strength is in separation unto Gods word alone. I need that more than anything!
    Good post Tom, press on brother!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thanks, Lisa Beth!

      RE: Detachment from our country and culture is a challenge for many Christians.

      That’s true. It’s so ingrained because the conflation of faith and nationalism was preached from American pulpits since the Pilgrims arrived 400 years ago.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. “ I believe we Christians need to think of ourselves more as ambassadors for the Lord and His Kingdom rather than deeply-rooted temporal citizens.”-AMEN!

    “ Jesus Christ, if that’s who you believe in, Jesus Christ, admittedly was not perfect when he was here on this earth. So why are we deifying the founders of this country, many of whom owned slaves?” 😳😳😳 He has a different Jesus!

    “ Well, EVERY Bible-believing, blood-bought, born-again Christian would surely recognize the folly of Lemon’s statement, or at least that is what I thought.”-AMEN!

    Excellent post again! All glory to God!!! 🙏🏻❤️
    (I had to sign in to comment??)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the support and comments, Beth! Yup all glory to God that we KNOW Jesus Christ, the PERFECT Savior!
      Don’t know why you had to sign in to comment? I haven’t changed anything. Thanks for letting me know. I’ll be watching to see if others have a problem.

  3. Difficult times to navigate and try to stay apolitical but love your bottom line. Seems to me that far too much of politics is all about varying degrees of humanistic imperfections, clouded by an awful lot of smoke and mirrors. Blessings!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks, Bruce!
      RE: smoke and mirrors
      I’ve seen what the Left can do. Here in New York State, the taxes have risen so high that any entrepreneur would have to be crazy to locate his/her business here. People are moving out in droves. Then there’s abortion, the LGBT crusade, and assaults on freedom of religion. On the other side is four more years of Donald Trump.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Cathy! I’m very much aware that I’m in the minority among evangelicals when it comes to my criticism of Christian nationalism, so I appreciate brothers and sisters who share my apolitical point of view.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Naw, I currently have 2 books in progress, my limit, but I have 12 more in the pile. That’s a lot more than usual for me. How’s your day going? I’m almost ready for evening couch duty.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My day is good! I’m at a a garden right now. Think it will all be closed again since our governor announced more strict restrictions; reading an economics book for a break lol

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’ve noticed you’ve been frequenting gardens. We only have one popular garden area in ROC and that’s Highland Park which has 500 different varieties of lilac bushes. The Lilac Festival is the area’s first big Summer festival. But the bushes peak in May. Tough to have gardens with ROC’s weather (and lack of funding dollars).

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Crissy! I’m curious how it is in Australia? Do evangelical Christians align closely with the conservative political party as they do here in the States? Do evangelical pastors mix faith and nationalism from the pulpit as many here do? Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Tom, speaking from my experience the answer to both questions would be “no”.
        Apart from the two main political parties, we also have the Christian Democratic Party based and Christian values and ethics. In Australia voting is compulsory. I imagine that if all Christians in this country voted for the CDP we would have a different outcome.
        I am yet to hear a pastor mix faith and nationalism from the pulpit.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Thanks, Crissy. I’m guessing there’s no other country in the world where the notion of Christian nationalism is as prevalent as it is in America. The Puritans set the tone when they came to America in 1630 believing it was the “New Jerusalem.” That’s been the accepted thinking for 400 years, although secularism is now making major inroads.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thanks for the informative article, Crissy! Like Australia, the vast majority of those who identify as “Christians” in the States are “cultural Christians” and that applies to many who profess to be “evangelicals.” I thought it was interesting that the article cites Ross Douthat, a conservative Roman Catholic, as a spokesperson for “genuine” (as opposed to “cultural”) Christians in the U.S.

        Liked by 2 people

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