Notre Dame in Paris catches fire

I’m sure most everyone has already seen the news reports about Notre Dame (Our Lady) cathedral in Paris, France catching fire today.

Notre Dame cathedral was completed in 1260 and is probably the second most famous Roman Catholic church in the world, next to St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

I hope no one was injured in the massive blaze. I don’t applaud the destruction of property or the endangerment of people’s lives, but I must comment that in 760 years, the Gospel of salvation by God’s grace through faith in Jesus Christ alone was NEVER preached inside of Notre Dame, no, not once. What was taught was Roman Catholicism’s false gospel of sacramental grace and merit. Countless Parisian natives and visitors entered into Notre Dame over the centuries and never heard the Gospel.

People are impressed by grandiose religious structures. Jesus wasn’t (Mark 13:2). Those imposing medieval cathedrals were monuments to the great temporal wealth and power of the Roman church, not to the Gospel of grace. Yes, artisans and peasant laborers worked for one hundred years to create a remarkable building, no denying that, but it was dedicated to a spiritually deadly false gospel.

If you think this post seems rather harsh and inopportune in light of the news, you’re welcome to send in a comment. I’m just saddened that people, including some “evangelicals,” will be distressed by the destruction at Notre Dame today, when millions upon millions of souls have been misled by the false gospel preached within those walls for close to 800 years. THAT is the real tragedy.

55 thoughts on “Notre Dame in Paris catches fire

    1. Thanks, sister! I don’t normally pay attention to the news during the day, but this story was one of the headline pop-ups on my laptop screen. A few years ago I listened to a very prominent evangelical on a radio segment gush profusely about the beauty and sheer inspiration of Notre Dame after her visit to Paris.

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      1. I can’t even imagine how difficult it is to hear things like that, knowing how deadly that false gospel is. It ought to bring every believer to tears of sorrow not inspiration.

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      2. Thanks, sister. Yes, its heartbreaking. The push toward ecumenism has steamrolled the distinct differences in salvation theology and the struggles of believers throughout church history. We couldn’t imagine a believer visiting Salt Lake City and gushing over the Mormon temple and tabernacle complex or the Watchtower’s new headquarters in Upstate New York, but yet it’s quite acceptable for a prominent evangelical to sing the praises of Notre Dame.

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      1. I recall several times after leaving Roman Catholicism that at least I knew that I didn’t have to be in that building or any building like that to worship the TRUE Lord! I often wondered what they thought they would do if they couldn’t take the Eucharist in the church if it burn down!

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      2. You bring up a good point. Priests or attendants were no doubt scurrying beneath the burning roof, risking their lives, to “save” the consecrated Jesus wafers in the church’s tabernacle box.

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      3. Right, We had a priest and nun die back in the 1960s in Rochester while trying to save the “Blessed Sacrament” in a church fire. The diocese is pushing their cause for “sainthood.”

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Roman Catholicism is clearly a cult and I see it more clearly every day! We must not be worried about what others think when it is called what it is….

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      5. Yes, and Catholicism is even more dangerous than one of those smaller cults because it has been granted mainstream “respectability.” I’ve noticed evangelical pastors will still warn of the dangers of Mormonism or the Watchtower but are not apt to mention the dangers of Catholicism.

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  1. Had to come here to your blog after hearing the news and just as I thought you wrote about this. The biggest tragedy of all is the fire of hell that those who preached in this building has sent people to, given the false gospel of Romanism.

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      1. I see the alleged crown of thorns, a piece of the “true” cross, and one of the crucifixion nails were “saved,” all bogus. Yes, Catholicism focuses on the material rather than the Creator.

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    1. Thanks, Bonnie! I was watching the news coverage last night and this morning, which included scenes of the huge crowds that had gathered in Paris that were so distraught over the burning of Notre Dame. The vast majority of those folks don’t even attend mass any longer, but they’re still attached to the religious traditions of family and country. There’s no sign of Jesus Christ in any of this religious sentimentalism. No, Jesus definitely was not impressed with grandiose buildings linked to religious institutionalism.

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  2. Well said, thank you. Yes, thankfully no lives lost in the fire, but so many souls deceived and headed where?!! Can’t believe the amount of evangelicals posting about “such a great loss”, and the art world too… 😦
    “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter! Isaiah 5:20

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  3. Yes, Tom, I agree. As I watched all the different news outlet coverage and how both the reporters and their guests were so sad about the fire and attached so much “religious” and cultural significance to the grand cathedral, I immediately thought about what Stephen said at the end of Acts chapter 7, verses 48-50 about God not living in houses made with human hands.

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    1. Thanks, Pete, and thanks for the very appropriate Bible passage. Yes, for religious unbelievers and even the non-religious sentimentalists, it’s all about the oyster shell rather than the pearl of great price, salvation by God’s grace through faith in Jesus Christ alone. I imagine all unbelievers (and a percentage of “evangelicals”) would attribute my post to a “fundamentalist fanatic.”

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  4. I thank you for boldly stating the truth. It is the first I have seen thus far in all the internet posts about the building that was burning. So much sadness has been expressed, even by people I thought were born-again Christians, over the damage done to a building they somehow equate with representing the church.

    I keep pointing out it is a Roman Catholic structure. It is not the body of believers. It is not the ekklesia.

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    1. Thank you, Steeny Lou! It is perplexing to me how believers overlook that Catholicism teaches a different gospel, even though Catholics are quite open and unapologetic about their salvation system of sacramental grace and merit.

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      1. Yeah; I was thinking earlier of some of the Protestant reactions I saw. There’s this guy on facebook who preaches only cheap grace and thinks those who are biblical are too smiliar to Pharisees. You know what he posted? He posted all lovey dovey stuff about Romanism and Notre Dame. I can’t help but to think of the irony of he’s blasting those who are promoting the biblical gospel of Grace and rushing to defend actual legalists. What a contradiction and inconsistency no?

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  5. A building is a just a building, and an idol is still an idol whether it be a church or a statue. The world is appalled about the destruction of a building but humanitarian crisis’ get ignored because we have grown so callused to them. We need to get our priorities straight.

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    1. Thanks. $1 billion raised in only two days to repair a building in which sacerdotal priests perpetuate sacrifice for sin. But Jesus Christ ended all sacrifice for sin and extends the gift of salvation to all those who repent of sin and accept Him as Savior by faith alone.

      Liked by 1 person

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