Mother Teresa?

…she believed in works salvation and universal redemption, both taught by her Catholic church.

“When I asked (Mother Teresa) whether she converted (anyone), she answered, ‘Yes, I convert. I convert you to be a better Hindu, or a better Muslim, or a better Protestant, or a better Catholic, or a better Parsee, or a better Sikh, or a better Buddhist. And after you have found God, it is for you to do what God wants you to do.’ She wanted people to come closer to God (however they understood Him) and believed that in this way they would also come closer to each other, love one another, and ultimately create a world that is better for everyone to live in.” – from What was Mother Teresa’s views on conversion?

Mother Teresa engaged in some charitable works, as have millions of others. But are works the way to salvation? Read more about Mother Teresa in the informative article below:

The Myth Of Mother Teresa
https://www.challies.com/articles/the-myth-of-mother-teresa/

If your pastor is lifting up Mother Teresa as an exemplary Christian, it’s time to find a different church.

Postscript: What prompted another post on Mother Teresa after having written about her several times in the past? My wife and I were invited over for dinner by an evangelical Christian couple two Saturday’s ago. Somewhere in the conversation, our hostess stated that she believed Mother Teresa was a Christian because of her charitable efforts and “sweet spirit.” I replied with several concrete reasons as to why Mother Teresa was NOT a Christian, including her publicly professed beliefs in works salvation and Universal redemption. The woman countered that she had read a book about Mother Teresa (“Mother Teresa: A Life Inspired” by Roman Catholic author, Wyatt North) and “just knew in her heart” that she was a Christian.

These days, “discernment” for many within the church is not about Biblical doctrine, but about feelings and emotion.

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17 thoughts on “Mother Teresa?

    1. Thanks, Wally. Yes, as the church moves increasingly toward ecumenism and away from doctrinal purity in regards to the Gospel and justification, people are going to increasingly balk at the statement that Mother Teresa was not a Christian. Universalism is creeping into the church and we’re going to see more and more allowances made not only for Catholics who teach salvation by sacramental grace and merit but also for “sincere” Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists as Joel Osteen and others have already done.

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      1. Well it’s a thing we have to approach with truth and Love Tom. It’s like i have said about people’s knowledge of Catholics in our work. Same with other groups such as Mormons or Jehovahs Witnesses. People will be real quick to declare they are not Christian, but wordless if you ask them why they said that. It can come across as nothing but irrational hate. Also if folks don’t clearly understand what is the problem with those faith systems then maybe they don’t understand their own. That could be a salvific issue when people start thinking that being one thing, such as Missionary Baptist, helps eternity and another thing, such as Catholic or Mormon, hurts it. Outside of Grace that is

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      2. Thanks, Wally. I know you work hard at presenting the genuine Gospel of grace to people. You’re right, so many people are against this and that denomination or religious group without really understanding what they teach. Pastors certainly don’t need to spend a lot of time pointing out denominations/ televangelists/etc. that don’t teach the genuine Gospel, but some time should be spent on this. People leave church and go home and turn on TBN and get sucked in. Right, church attendance or membership doesn’t make anyone a Christian, but some denominations/churches outright just don’t preach the genuine Gospel and people who sit in the pews of those churches Sunday after Sunday never hear the Gospel.

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    1. Thanks Crissy. Yes, I read that she was tormented by doubts about the existence of God for many years. She followed the (g)od of Catholic ritualism and legalism. There’s no peace, joy, or assurance from following the wafer Jesus.

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  1. Don’t you grit your teeth every time Theresa is quoted as though she was some genuinely spiritual, godly woman? (Especially by Christians!!) I do. What she believed in was so false, and she spread her own brand of RCC deception. It’s been said she’d been given so much funding, that there could have been a wonderful, modern hospital in Calcutta. Instead she made her “patients” suffer, so that they could be closer to God. One sermon we heard praised her for choosing a pair of shoes too small (there were shoes her own size) so that she would deliberately suffer, and apparently her feet did suffer from this…this sermon was preached by a young physiotherapist! You’d think he would have thought it was ridiculous doing this? And why? I don’t blame you for once again writing about her, after listening to someone say that she “knew in her heart she was a Christian!”😳 It’s very sad how deceived people are thinking that she was so wonderful etc.

    Anyway, I’m commenting also as I came across an article of another subject, and scrolled back to this date to see if you’d mentioned it. I couldn’t see it, but maybe I’ve missed it. Will paste a link: https://www.technocracy.news/one-world-religion-pope-francis-signs-historic-covenant-with-islam/

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    1. Thanks for the good comments on mother Teresa and for the link to the “interfaith” document signed by pope Francis and the grand imam. I had seen references to the document but didn’t post on it directly so thanks for that. It’s no surprise since the Vatican has been pushing ecumenism and inter-faith dialogue since Vatican II, but something like this document is definitely a formal step to the eventual one world church. All that’s needed is a global catastrophe for the world to seek “spiritual guidance” from the pope.

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