The Journey “Home” or the journey into spiritual bondage?

EWTN (Eternal Word Television Network) is a traditionalist Catholic communications conglomerate that was founded in 1981 by Catholic nun, “mother” Angelica (aka Rita Antoinette Rizzo).

One of the most popular programs on the EWTN cable television channel is “The Journey Home,” hosted by Marcus Grodi. During the hour-long presentation, Grodi interviews reverts and converts to Roman Catholicism. The guests express their profound appreciation for “coming home” to the “one true church,” with its alleged “apostolic authority” and spiritually “essential” sacraments.

Catholicism teaches a person must receive its sacraments and obey the Ten Commandments perfectly in order to merit their salvation. That is not something to be happy about, but is actually an impossible burden shared by all who believe they must earn their salvation. How much is enough? How good is good enough? It’s a religious treadmill that never ends in this lifetime and ultimately leads to eternal damnation. I was a Roman Catholic for twenty-seven years until I accepted Jesus Christ as my Savior by faith alone. Praise the Lord that my salvation is secured in His perfect, imputed righteousness and not my own miserable efforts. I have no righteousness other than my Savior’s righteousness.

Conservative Roman Catholics tune into “The Journey Home” and find great encouragement and satisfaction in the stories of those who have returned or converted to Catholicism. I, however, feel tremendous sadness for all those who have voluntarily submitted to the spiritual chains of Rome. I will readily admit that the rituals, ceremonies, great pomp and circumstance, and worldly trappings of Catholicism hold great appeal to many, but beneath the whited sepulchre is a grave full of dead men’s bones. Former “evangelicals” who appear on the show never genuinely trusted in Christ or they wouldn’t be celebrating their spiritual shackles.

“The Journey Home” purposely leaves its audience with the false impression that many Americans are converting to Catholicism. In actuality, for every person baptized, the U.S. Catholic church loses six members. See here. All a Catholic needs to do is look around at the empty pews in church on Sunday morning to comprehend what’s really going on. I praise the Lord for the large number of those souls who left Catholicism and accepted Christ and now follow the Lord as members of evangelical Christian fellowships. Thank you, Lord, for opening the eyes of so many and freeing them from the chains of Catholicism! Thank you, Jesus!

Genuine evangelical believers can’t boast of any communications conglomerates* as part of a colossal religious institution, but there are many testimonies available from ex-Catholics who left the legalism and ritualism of Rome and and accepted the free gift of salvation by God’s grace through faith in Jesus Christ alone. For just a few examples, see here, here, and here.

It’s quite interesting to me that Catholics eagerly crow about “evangelicals” who have converted to Roman Catholicism on such outlets as “The Journey Home,” yet many/most evangelicals are absolutely mortified when a fellow believer “uncharitably” asserts that Rome teaches a false gospel.

“But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it – the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction: for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.” – Romans 3:21-24

* Some might point to the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) as an evangelical media enterprise but that outfit is operated by the purveyors of the false “health and wealth”/”name it and claim it” prosperity gospel and regularly features Catholic guests and spokespersons.

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16 thoughts on “The Journey “Home” or the journey into spiritual bondage?

    1. Thank you, Maria. I noticed a convert to Catholicism who used to send comments objecting to my posts a couple of years ago will be appearing on the program next month. Very sad.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re on to something. Actually, Pew Research has shown that for every “evangelical” who converts to Catholicism, five Catholics join evangelical fellowships. The crazy thing is, if an evangelical ministry had a show on television that interviewed ex-Catholics who had accepted Christ, joined an evangelical fellowship, and spoke about the errors of Catholicism, many/most evangelicals would view such a show to be uncharitable and divisive.

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      1. Good point on the double standard. By the way if Evangelical ministries feature testimonies of ex-Catholics coming to Christ I actually think there would be more Catholics coming to Christ.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. RE: By the way if Evangelical ministries feature testimonies of ex-Catholics coming to Christ I actually think there would be more Catholics coming to Christ.

        I agree wholeheartedly but evangelicals inexplicably walk on eggshells when it comes to the RCC.

        Liked by 2 people

  1. It sounds like you are critiquing Pelagianism (or Semi-Pelagianism) – not Roman Catholicism. Have you ever heard of the Second Council of Orange (or Trent)? Catholic doctrine is precisely opposed to “earning” salvation. There is, however, cooperation with unmerited grace given out of the superabundance of God’s love, which is ALWAYS sufficient within a person for doing what God’s moral demands as ordered toward beatitude – whether it actually becomes efficient (i.e. really turns into a supernaturally good act) is a fruit of cooperation – which, by the way, is its own unmerited grace. So you are attacking a real error, it’s just not located where you think it is. Your RCC is a strawman.

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    1. RE: “Catholic doctrine is precisely opposed to “earning” salvation. There is, however, cooperation with unmerited grace…”

      Catholics are a funny lot. They will protest, protest, and protest some more that their salvation system is all about (sacramental) grace, grace, grace. But if pressed long enough, they will eventually concede “cooperation with grace” aka merit is a prime ingredient in their salvation formula. Thanks. Despite the requisite Catholic doublespeak, you did the work for me.

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      1. Hi Tom,

        If we don’t cooperate with grace working within us, then we resist the grace within us. See, for example, Acts 7:51 as compared with Romans 8:28. There is no third option… Resist, or cooperate. To resist grace, in the moral sense, is to sin. Are you suggesting that sin gets us to Heaven? If it is not sin, then it is cooperation.

        As I noted, even this cooperation is itself a grace. Resistance, however, we do all on our own.

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      2. Hi CRM, So then you are saying Catholics believe obedience is totally by grace, mainly via the sacraments, and that disobedience is attributed to free will? Yet Catholics who regularly partake of the sacraments, still disobey God’s laws, otherwise their would be no confession. So the bottom line for Catholics is still merited justification.

        Catholics are taught they must become increasingly sanctified (holy) in this life in order to be able to die in a “state of grace.”

        Bible Christians believe we have no goodness in ourselves and can only be made right with God by accepting Jesus Christ as our Savior and receiving His imputed perfect righteousness. Catholics hope to stand before God in a state of goodness they have achieved, with God’s help. Christians believe we have no goodness in and of ourselves and will stand before God only with the imputed perfect righteousness of our Savior.

        I’ve written extensively on these two opposing views of justification and salvation:
        https://excatholic4christ.wordpress.com/category/salvation/

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  2. You write, “Catholicism teaches a person must receive its sacraments and obey the Ten Commandments perfectly in order to merit their salvation.”

    I’ve corrected you on this before: The Church does not teach that one must “obey the Ten Commandments perfectly” in order to be saved. Salvation comes by faith, repentance and baptism. Not every violation of a commandment is a mortal sin resulting in loss of salvation. For example a slight or unintentional act of disrespect towards one’s parents is a violation of one of the Ten Commandments, but does not result in eternal damnation.

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    1. Catholics must obey all of the Ten Commandments and not just in deed, but in thought and word as Jesus makes clear in Matthew 5. You refer to minor/”venial” sins but the RCC has a difficult time finding the exact line that separates mortal sin from venial. It’s all a self-justifying ruse.
      You can keep trying to correct me on this point but I will keep writing it. Catholics must obey the Law perfectly because that is exactly what Jesus required (Matthew 5:48, James 2:10). But since Jesus was the only person to successfully obey the Law perfectly, I gladly accept His imputed perfect righteousness. I couldn’t obey the Law for one day and neither can you.
      Accept Christ. Only those who can admit they are sick and helpless seek a doctor. Please refer to “The Gospel According to Rome” by James G. McCarthy for any future concerns you may have. I don’t have the time to constantly debate a dedicated works-religionist.

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