Roman Catholic hierarchy similar to the Scribes and Pharisees?

Catholics who are new to reading the New Testament will find an uncannycard resemblance between the Scribes and Pharisees of Jesus’s day and the Roman Catholic priests and church hierarchy.

“And in the hearing of all the people he said to his disciples, “Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes, and love greetings in the marketplaces and the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at feasts, who devour widows’ houses and for a pretense make long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation.” – Luke 20:45-47


The Divine Rebuke of Corrupt Religious Authority by Mike Gendron
http://www.puregospeltruth.com/the-divine-rebuke-of-corrupt-religious-authority-by-mike-gendron.html

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4 thoughts on “Roman Catholic hierarchy similar to the Scribes and Pharisees?

  1. This is a very interesting similarity. However, I think it’s found in any “religion” who has leaders who hold themselves above everyone else. I certainly saw this as a JW growing up. These leaders forget they are sinners and need forgiveness.
    Humble are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yup, the temptation for religious leaders is certainly to “lord it over” their followers. When the capital of the Roman empire was switched to Constantinople, the bishop of Rome filled the vacuum. The increasingly institutionalized church was shaped according to the imperial model. The pope became the de facto emperor of the West (until Charlemagne) and his cardinals and bishops lived as regal princes.

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    1. Thanks, Jim. I had studied Luke 20 prior to my wife and I reading the chapter last night, and the three verses really resonate with me as an ex-Catholic. When my wife, also an ex-Catholic, read the verses she stopped and turned to me and said, “We know all about that.” When I read the New Testament for the first time as a Catholic the Holy Spirit was constantly revealing the discrepancies between Catholic teaching and practice and Scripture.

      Liked by 2 people

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